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October 16, 1934: The Long March

The embattled Chinese Communists break through Nationalist enemy lines and begin an epic flight from their encircled headquarters in southwest China. Known as Ch’ang Cheng—the “Long March”—the retreat lasted 368 days and covered 6,000 miles, nearly twice the distance from New York to San Francisco.

Civil war in China between the Nationalists and the Communists broke out in 1927. In 1931, Communist leader Mao Zedong was elected chairman of the newly established Soviet Republic of China, based in Kiangsi province in the southwest. Between 1930 and 1934, the Nationalists under Chiang Kai-shek launched a series of five encirclement campaigns against the Soviet Republic. Under the leadership of Mao, the Communists employed guerrilla tactics to resist successfully the first four campaigns, but in the fifth, Chiang raised 700,000 troops and built fortifications around the Communist positions. Hundreds of thousands of peasants were killed or died of starvation in the siege, and Mao was removed as chairman by the Communist Central Committee. The new Communist leadership employed more conventional warfare tactics, and its Red Army was decimated.

With defeat imminent, the Communists decided to break out of the encirclement at its weakest points. The Long March began at 5:00 p.m. on October 16, 1934. Secrecy and rear-guard actions confused the Nationalists, and it was several weeks before they realized that the main body of the Red Army had fled. The retreating force initially consisted of 86,000 troops, 15,000 personnel, and 35 women. Weapons and supplies were borne on men’s backs or in horse-drawn carts, and the line of marchers stretched for 50 miles. The Communists generally marched at night, and when the enemy was not near, a long column of torches could be seen snaking over valleys and hills into the distance.

The first disaster came in November, when Nationalist forces blocked the Communists’ route across the Hsiang River. It took a week for the Communists to break through the fortifications and cost them 50,000 men—more than half their number. After that debacle, Mao steadily regained his influence, and in January he was again made chairman during a meeting of the party leaders in the captured city of Tsuni. Mao changed strategy, breaking his force into several columns that would take varying paths to confuse the enemy. There would be no more direct assaults on enemy positions. And the destination would now be Shensi Province, in the far northwest, where the Communists hoped to fight the Japanese invaders and earn the respect of China’s masses.

After enduring starvation, aerial bombardment, and almost daily skirmishes with Nationalist forces, Mao halted his columns at the foot of the Great Wall of China on October 20, 1935. Waiting for them were five machine-gun- and red-flag-bearing horsemen. “Welcome, Chairman Mao,” one said. “We represent the Provincial Soviet of Northern Shensi. We have been waiting for you anxiously. All that we have is at your disposal!” The Long March was over.

The Communist marchers crossed 24 rivers and 18 mountain ranges, mostly snow-capped. Only 4,000 troops completed the journey. The majority of those who did not perished. It was the longest continuous march in the history of warfare and marked the emergence of Mao Zedong as the undisputed leader of the Chinese Communists. Learning of the Communists’ heroism and determination in the Long March, thousands of young Chinese traveled to Shensi to enlist in Mao’s Red Army. After fighting the Japanese for a decade, the Chinese Civil War resumed in 1945. Four years later, the Nationalists were defeated, and Mao proclaimed the People’s Republic of China. He served as chairman until his death in 1976.



National Geographic Photo of the Day

Neon Nights

With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs. Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City.

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Sandy Oasis

Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, is a nation of tranquility, but Sandy Island takes it to another level. This speck of sand in the bright blue waters is constantly reshaped by the ocean and weather, and visitors to the cay are encouraged to make reservations. Your Shot photographer Matthew Wade captured this shot using a drone.

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Golden Hills

Your Shot photographer Hannah Overeem captured this shot of her dog, Badger, an Australian cattle dog, in Chino Hills, California. She writes that the contrast of the golden field and blue-and-white sky give this image a “surreal” look.

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Hidden Gem

Forged by the wear of water rushing over rocks, Olo Canyon in Arizona is concealed inside the Grand Canyon. Its alluring landscape includes natural springs and rocks shaped like cathedral amphitheaters.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "Are We Losing the Grand Canyon?"




Behind the Curtain

Circus performers in Hanoi, Vietnam, prepare for the show minutes before it gets under way. Nguyen Thi Thu Hiep, shown here stretching, is a contortionist. For extra money, she also performs at private parties and social events.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "A Life at the Circus: Going Behind the Curtain in Vietnam."




'You Dropped Something!'

Your Shot photographer Suyash Mehta gained a souvenir from a passing eagle in Satara, India: a long feather. India is home to nearly two dozen eagle species.

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City of Sun Showers

Even in a rainstorm, Paris lives up to its nickname of the City of Light, as sun streaks through storm clouds over the city in this image by Your Shot photographer Raffaele Tuzio.

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A Flash in the Distance

Flashes of lightning illuminate the night sky above Lake Ontario, as seen from an overlook in Lyndonville, New York—located about an hour from the Canadian border at Niagara Falls.

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Flood of Color

Floods bring a mosaic of color to the rice fields of Y Ty, Vietnam. The wet season typically lasts from May to June in the mountainous village.

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A Walk on the Wild Side

Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in China’s Wolong Nature Reserve. China has been creating reserves to restore and protect disappearing panda habitat and is now introducing captive-bred pandas into the wild.

See more pictures from the August 2016 feature story "Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side."




A Popular Perch

Birds gather on a rock formation—a popular attraction for both seabirds and people—at Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California. Your Shot photographer Laurence Norah writes that it’s “a wonderful place to get the sunset … A long exposure added a slightly surreal element to the shot.”

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High-Rise and Shine

The brightly colored lights of Shinjuku, a ward of Tokyo, Japan, glitter in this double exposure by Masayuki Yamashita. The district is a bustling hub and home to what’s known as the world’s busiest railway station: Shinjuku Station, through which millions of passengers pass daily.

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Whale of a Time

A whale shark—the biggest fish in the sea—swims along, “extremely curious” about his observers. Your Shot photographer David Robinson, who researches whale shark ecology, captured this image in Qatar on a day with “great visibility” in an area with waters that are usually full of plankton.

Robinson's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Life on Mars

Your Shot member Bryan Geiger’s early morning visit to the summit area of Haleakalā volcano in Hawaii’s Haleakalā National Park yielded this extraordinary image of an otherworldly landscape. “I woke up at 3 a.m. and drove to Haleakalā summit,” Geiger writes. “As the sun came up it revealed only a white wall of mist. After a couple of hours, disappointed and cold, I decided to leave. While driving back I jumped out at the overlook to see if anything had changed. At that moment the clouds retreated and I had only an instant to snap this photo of the [alien-looking] land.”

Geiger's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Western Spirit

Framing an expansive blue sky, desert buttes, and a pair of majestic horses, Your Shot member Nora Feddal captures the essence of the American West in this image made while visiting Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which extends into both Arizona and Utah.

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Night Falls

By day, the water of Arizona's Havasu Falls is a remarkable, bright blue-green. In this image submitted by Jes Stockhausen, it’s a milky ribbon, illuminated at night by the light of a camper’s headlamps. “While camping in the Havasupai [Indian Reservation], you hear the roar of the falls 24/7. My friend and I went to see if we could see the stars and were blown away [by] the sheer darkness of the canyon. This shot was [made] with two headlamps, one at the subject’s feet and one on his head.”

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First Light

Photographer Theerasak Saksritawee submitted this photo of birds taking flight in a golden sky over Taiwan’s National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall. The memorial, dedicated to the former president of the Republic of China, includes gardens, ponds, and this sprawling plaza, a popular spot for national celebrations.

Saksritawee's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen

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A Walk in the Park

Photographer Graham De Lacy captured this shot of an African elephant taking a sunny-day stroll in South Africa’s Madikwe Game Reserve. “[It was] one of the many close encounters … I’ve had the pleasure of experiencing,” De Lacy writes. African elephants are the largest land mammals on Earth.

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Pelican Party

Pelicans, seen from above in this aerial shot submitted by Your Shot community member Stas Bartnikas, congregate on the Colorado River in Mexico. The social birds usually travel in flocks and are found on many of the world’s coastlines and along lakes and rivers.

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Lifting the Veil

A lacy veil of cigarette smoke encircles a man in Sarawak, one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. “I embarked on photography trips to inland Sarawak to seek out the native people [who] preserve their way of life,” Your Shot member Jonathan Nyik Fui Tai says. ”Many of the tribes have slowly [been] assimilated into modern society.”

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Hot Rock

Spiking from inky storm clouds, a white-hot thunderbolt spears the plateau during a summer storm in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The monument comprises 300,000 unspoiled acres that cross both Arizona and Utah and contain steep cliffs, deep canyons, and sandstone formations.

Rankin’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Black Water

Seen from above, a small boat travels the Buriganga River, thick and dark with pollution, in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. Though the water is filled with human and industrial waste, millions depend on it for their livelihood and transportation. “The Buriganga is economically very important to Dhaka,” Your Shot photographer Jakir Hossain Rana writes. “Launches and country boats provide a connection to other parts of Bangladesh.”

Rana’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Rose-Tinted Spectacle

Sunset splashes a rosy tint over the landscape in this image submitted by Fabrizio Fortuna. The mountain is the 1,500-foot (457-meter) Vestrahorn, a main landmark of southeastern Iceland.

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Pushed for Time

“One of the best places [to photograph] in Cairo, Egypt, is the camels market,” writes Your Shot member Nader Saadallah. “At this moment, the camels’ keepers and sellers [are] trying to push the camel into their vehicle to send it to the local market to be slaughtered to be ready for customers.”

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Old Guard

“Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water,” Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty. “This place is magical.”

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Mashable

The world looks different after today's big neutron star collision discovery

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My grandmother died in 2013. 

She was a stubborn, brilliant woman who ardently believed in the value of science. She came of age in Brooklyn, but I knew her as my Nana in Los Angeles who worked with dinosaur bones. 

When she died, my grandfather gave me one of Nana's necklaces: A jade stone with a gold chain. I wear it most days. 

After today, I will look at that necklace differently. 

SEE ALSO: Researchers watched as gold was made millions of light-years from Earth

While the jade stone on Nana's necklace was forged in the high heat and pressure of the Earth — an appropriate tribute to Nana's roots as a geologist — the gold of the necklace she once wore is alien in origin.  Read more...

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Maisie Williams' response to Sophie Turner's engagement is exactly what you'd expect it to be

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Coding isn't always easy to learn, and some of the products that are designed to teach coding can be equally as difficult to figure out. These new building blocks on Kickstarter, however, are aiming to make coding lessons a snap.

SEE ALSO: Get access to 3,000+ coding training courses for less than $60

Cubroid is the latest toy that wants to teach kids programming at a young age. This building block set includes blocks with motors, LED lights, touch sensors, light sensors, sound function, and proximity sensors. How you use them and what you build is completely up to you. (Or, er, your kids.) Read more...

More about Kickstarter, Lego, Coding, Legos, and Coding Toys


'Angry Birds' gets metal with Iron Maiden tribute

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Apparently the team behind Angry Birds are big metalheads.

A new character is coming to the mobile game Angry Birds Evolution: a bird version of Iron Maiden's undead mascot, Eddie. For a limited time, Angry Birds Evolution players have a chance to unlock Eddie the Bird and wreak heavy metal havoc.

Players can unlock Eddie the Bird starting Oct. 18. Sick. Read more...

More about Mobile, Music, Gaming, Angry Birds, and Iron Maiden


If you love animals watch this video

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Mashable visited an animal shelter in New York City that's helping thousands of cats and dogs find forever homes. The volunteers play a crucial role in helping to care for these animals and show them the love they deserve. 

We took a walk in the shoes of a volunteer to see what it takes to help run a shelter for these cute furry friends. Read more...

More about Dogs, Animals, Cats, Mashable Video, and Animal


Why Twitter's 30 million bots are here to stay

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Bots are a thriving part of Twitter's user base, and it's likely they'll continue showing up alongside our own human tweets. 

Twitter bots can be thought of as autonomous programs or entities that generate social content. Some of this content is harmless, like sports updates, and some of it intentionally malicious and polarizing — like the over 1,600 known bots that tweeted extremist right-wing views during the polarizing 2016 campaign, explored in a recent report from Bloomberg.

The influence of bots is strong, and much of this strength comes from sheer numbers. Earlier this year, researchers from the University of Southern California and Indiana University suggested that between nine and 15 percent of of Twitter users are actually bots. Twitter has around 328 million users globally, so even if the low estimate is taken, that's 30 million bots. Read more...

More about Tech, Twitter, Twitter Bots, Twitter News, and Russian Election Interference


Chelsea Clinton again calls out Trump for an offensive joke (this one's about killing people)

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It would be that in an exposé of Vice President Mike Pence, it's a reported comment from President Donald Trump about his veep's views that's putting the president right back in the hot seat.

SEE ALSO: Chelsea Clinton had the best response when Trump blocked a cancer patient on Twitter

A new New Yorker story, "The Danger of President Pence," dug out incredible details about Pence's history, his rise to the vice presidency, and his relationship to Trump. Toward the end of the lengthy piece, author Jane Mayer reported on what Trump thinks about his political partner. 

The last part about gay rights was picked up as especially cruel, and not at all funny. Chelsea Clinton, who has called out Trump before (and before that), was quick to reprimand the president about having a little basic decency. Read more...

More about Donald Trump, Gay Rights, New Yorker, Mike Pence, and Chelsea Clinton


Netflix now plans to spend $8 billion to keep you glued on your couch

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Netflix just keeps raising the ceiling on its content aspirations. 

The company officially announced that it could spend up to $8 billion on original video in 2018—a cool billion dollars more than it had previously planned

Ted Sarandos, head of content at Netflix, recently said publicly that the company could hit the $8 billion mark, but Monday's quarterly earnings report made it official.

"With $17 billion in content commitments over the next several years and a growing library of owned content ($2.5 billion net book value at the end of the quarter), we remain quite comfortable with our ability to please our members around the world. We’ll spend $7-8 billion on content (on a P&L basis) in 2018," Netflix wrote in its earnings release. Read more...

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Elon Musk unveils his plans to build cities in space

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Elon Musk wants his Big F'ing Rocket (yes, that's really what it's called) spacecraft to start transporting people to Mars as soon as 2024. Read more...

More about Nasa, Mashable Video, Mars, Elon Musk, and Spaceflight


When will Hillary Clinton break her silence on 'Rick and Morty's Szechuan sauce?

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It's been almost two weeks since McDonalds revealed they hadn't produced enough promotional Szechuan sauce to satisfy the rabid Rick and Morty fanbase.

Fans everywhere are mildly disappointed. Desperate for sauce packets, a vocal population has made their demands known. Nearly everyone, it seems, has an opinion on the matter.

So where is Hillary Clinton?

SEE ALSO: Hillary Clinton calls Trump the most dangerous president in U.S. history

In a times like this, we expect our leaders to take action. Maybe shouldn't be surprised that neo-liberal sellout Hillary Clinton — who we all know is the hands of big condiment — has failed to issue a public statement on the matter.  Read more...

More about Watercooler, Culture, and Web Culture


Now the Producers Guild of America is also looking to boot Harvey Weinstein

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The dominoes keep falling for Harvey Weinstein. Days after the Academy of Motion Picture Arts voted to expel the alleged rapist, the Producers Guild of America has also begun the process of kicking him out.

SEE ALSO: Harvey Weinstein expelled from motion picture academy

The guild has voted to "institute termination proceedings," per the official statement obtained by Mashable. Weinstein will have a chance to respond before the board makes its final decision on November 6. 

The move is clearly meant to send a message about sexual abuse within Hollywood. "Sexual harassment of any type is completely unacceptable," reads the statement. "This is a systemic and pervasive problem requiring immediate industry-wide action."  Read more...

More about Harvey Weinstein, Entertainment, and Movies Tv Shows


Hidden data suggests new Pokémon and a Halloween event are coming to 'Pokémon Go'

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Get ready for the next generation of Pokémon in Pokémon Go. Video game sleuths from the group known as the Silph Road uncovered a whole bunch of hidden data added to Pokémon Go in its latest update. The intel suggests that the third generation of Pokémon may be coming to the game soon, along with some Halloween content.

SEE ALSO: 'Pokémon Snap' lives on through 'Pokémon Go' photography contest

The latest Pokémon Go data mine includes sound files for Pokémon from Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald (a.k.a. gen III), a new badge labeled gen III, a new Halloween loading page, some Halloween music, and files that imply there may be a Halloween event and Halloween variants of some Pokémon. Read more...

More about Gaming, Halloween, Pokemon, Pokemon Go, and Gen 3


Newt, it takes just a few seconds to proofread a tweet

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Typos are a fact of life. Today's example: Newt Gingrich, tweeting his steadfast support for "Presideent Trtump."

In the words of the former speaker of the House, "Trtump was rermarkably stgroing in hius joint press event with" Senator Mitch McConnell held earlier Monday at the White House. 

A glowing review!

SEE ALSO: Trump and Mitch McConnell formally announce bromance in weird Rose Garden press conference

Gingrich has replaced the original tweet with a legible version.  "Sometimes my ideas are faster than my fingers," he claims, which...fine. Just for future ref, Newt– it takes about three seconds to proofread a tweet before pressing send.  Read more...

More about Politics, Culture, Culture, Social Media Companies, and Politics


Samsung taps the Internet of Things to track your stuff

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Samsung wants to make sure you never lose your stuff again. And is tapping the Internet of Things to do it. 

The consumer electronics giant has introduced the Samsung Connect Tag, which can clip on to any object, and accurately relay the object's location to your smartphone. 

Connect Tag will, as its name indicates, help you keep track of your stuff. If you've lost a device attached to Connect Tag, you can request its location from an app on your phone. And if your kid gets lost, they can press a button on Connect Tag to send you their exact location. 

But Samsung's late to the track-your-stuff game. There are plenty of other companies already trying to help you do just this, the difference here is that Samsung is leaning hard into the Internet of Things to extend range with its Connect Tag — no bluetooth needed. Read more...

More about Samsung, Tracking, Tagging, Tracking Device, and Samsung Connect Tag


The Hamburger Helper has finally confirmed what its skeleton looks like

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Riddle me this: What has four arms, but also none?

Reader, it is the Hamburger Helper.

SEE ALSO: Hamburger Helper's April Fool's rap album is actually excellent

In a tweet Monday, the famous glove, rapper, and corporate feminist confirmed the anatomy of its skeletal system — solving a mystery that internet denizens have been trying to solve for days.

If I must pic.twitter.com/avKPZm80CX

— Helper (@helper) October 16, 2017

It all started with this inquiry from Twitter user @soongrowtired, who tweeted this on Saturday:

someone who is good at science please help which is the correct anatomy of hamburger helper pic.twitter.com/TRW1Ah8lod

— BOOma Thurman (@soongrowtired) October 14, 2017 Read more...

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Security camera catches dog peeing on man's back

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Sure, he's still a good dog, but he's also kind of a jerk.

A man sitting on a curb using his phone in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil had an unexpected run-in with a local stray. The dog sneaks up behind the man, smells him, and then takes a piss right on his back.

The man is rightfully upset, and as he chases the dog away, another stray comes to check out the action. We're pretty sure the second dog bet the first dog to do it. Read more...

More about Dogs, Culture, and Animals


Google Photos will now automatically recognize pics of your pets

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Google knows that your phone holds untold gigabytes of snapshots of your favorite animal friends. So the search giant is making it even easier to group those pics all together.

SEE ALSO: Why the iPhone 8 Plus is a better camera than a real camera

The algorithm behind Google Photos will now be able to recognize your Very Good dogs and cats automatically, and will group the reams of photos you've taken of them just like it does with pics of people. Google announced the new functionality in a blog post, which is alone worth a read for the sheer number of paw puns pulled off in five short paragraphs.  Read more...

More about Google, Dogs, Animals, Cats, and Pets


100 people attempt to eat durian, the stinkiest fruit in the world

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Durian is a spiny Asian fruit that emits a distinct odor, which many people find offensive. Some say it smells like rotting trash, others say it smells like "dick cheese."

The fruit isn't very common in America, so many people are completely unfamiliar with the its reputation. Using this to their advantage, Cut Video decided to give the fruit to 100 people, and have them give it a whirl for the first time. 

Reactions were nearly unanimous — durian is gross.  Read more...

More about Food, Durian, Cut Video, Culture, and Food


Facebook just acquired tbh and its 5 million teen users

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Facebook just scored a huge win its quest to win over teens.

The company has acquired tbh, the anonymous app that's been going viral with teens. The app, which is targeted toward middle school and high school students, is a network that allows users to swap compliments by participating in anonymous "quizzes."

SEE ALSO: Download this: the new anonymous app that's going viral with teens

It's proved to be a winning formula for tbh, which has been in the App Store's top ten for weeks.

Facebook confirmed the acquisition saying, “tbh and Facebook share a common goal - of building community and enabling people to share in ways that bring us closer together." Read more...

More about Tech, Facebook, Television, Trump, and Apps And Software


Kevin Hart responded to The Rock's workout bragging and well, he tried

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There's never a dull moment with these two. 

Last week Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson posted a video of himself working out with heavy chains around his neck. No big deal or anything. 

He explained in the video, "Putting in work. Big dogs eat. Little crying puppies stay on the porch." 

In his caption, he gave a shoutout to "all my big dogs around the world as we're over here quietly on our weekend grind earning sweat equity," and ended the post with "Heavy ass chains around your neck are always optional."

SEE ALSO: The Rock responds to that life hack he inspired for men who can't stop sexually harassing female colleagues Read more...

More about Instagram, Culture, The Rock, Dwayne The Rock Johnson, and Dwayne Johnson


What the KRACK Wi-Fi vulnerability means for you and your devices

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So it turns out your Wi-Fi is vulnerable to hackers. A newly released research paper dropped a pretty sizable security bomb: The security protocol protecting most Wi-Fi devices can essentially be bypassed, potentially allowing an attacker to intercept every password, credit-card number, or super-secret cat pic you send over the airwaves.

So what, if anything, can you do about all this — other than go back to the Ethernet cable-laden Dark Ages? While at present there is no all-encompassing way to protect your Wi-Fi, there are a few steps that you can take to mitigate your risk. And you definitely should.  Read more...

More about Cybersecurity, Hackers, Hacking, Wi Fi, and Wpa2


The shocking similarities of artificial intelligence on and off the movie screens

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Jay Iorio, futurist and Innovations Director for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association, joins us to talk about Artificial Intelligence on screen. Could we really fall in love with Her? Are Westworld's 'reveries' within reach? How does a Terminator know what's funny? 

Visit CineFix for more episodes and movie-related content.  Read more...

More about Hbo, Artificial Intelligence, Anthony Hopkins, Blade Runner, and Sci Fi


All the most badass Hillary Clinton quotes from her interviews abroad

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Hillary Clinton has taken her What Happened book tour abroad, and the former Secretary of State had some pretty biting things to say about life, politics, and the Tweeter-In-Chief over the weekend. 

During her stints in the United Kingdom and Australia, she appeared on Australia Broadcasting Corp.'s Four Corners and Britain’s The Andrew Marr Show, and she made a speech in London.

SEE ALSO: Hillary Clinton calls Trump the most dangerous president in U.S. history

And hooooo boyyyy she didn't hold anything back. Here are seven times Hill spit straight up fire: Read more...

When she called Trump a 'sexual assaulter'

More about Conversations, Politics, Uk, Australia, and Russia


Flight crew accused of 'screaming' as plane plummets 20,000 feet in minutes

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A scary moment up in the air turned even more horrific as passengers aboard a plummeting plane claimed the flight crew started freaking out.

AirAsia flight QZ535 left from Perth, Australia Sunday  and headed to Bali, Indonesia. However,  shortly after takeoff the plane dropped almost 23,800 feet in nine minutes, according to the Associated Press.

SEE ALSO: Scared of flying? For the love of God, don't watch this video.

The pressurization issue in the cabin prompted oxygen masks to drop from the ceiling amid emergency announcements from the crew, which were apparently far from calm.

One passenger, Clare Askew, said that, "The panic was escalated because of the behavior of staff who were screaming, looked tearful and shocked." Another passenger told news outlets, "They went hysterical. There was no real panic before that. Then everyone panicked." Read more...

More about Travel, Airplane, Air Travel, Indonesia, and Bali


Find Your Spark

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Read more...More about Mashable Reels, Dji Spark, Dji Drones, Tech, and Drones


Joe Jonas and Sophie Turner revealed their engagement through matching Instagram posts

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Game of Thrones star Sophie Turner and Joe Jonas are engaged. Their relationship was rumored to have begun in November of 2016. The couple made their engagement official in January after posting matching photos on Instagram, with Turner captioning 'I said yes' and Jonas captioning it 'She said yes.'  Read more...

More about Instagram, Couples, Celebrity, Wedding, and Love


These AI learn by competing against each other, and it looks ridiculous

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Researchers at Elon Musk's startup, OpenAI, think they have discovered the most efficient way to train artificial neural networks: have them compete against each other.

The researchers have created simulations of human sports, like sumo wrestling and soccer, and pitted the AI players against each other. Winning techniques are rewarded through behavioral reinforcement, while the losing AI is encouraged to try different moves.

The 'self-play' method ensures that the AI are always learning, and that their tasks are always the perfect difficulty: facing off against different versions of itself. And, yes, it looks pretty funny. Read more...

More about Sports, Technology, Mashable Video, Artificial Intelligence, and Elon Musk


Tesla unveils a brand new dual-charging port for Chinese vehicles

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Https%3a%2f%2fvdist.aws.mashable.com%2fcms%2f2017%2f10%2f1cc124c4 6d37 87e2%2fthumb%2f00001 Read more...

More about China, Tesla, Electric Vehicles, Charging Port, and Electric Charging Stations


If you can't handle the heat, this watch might help

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The 'Aircon' watch might just be the solution to the age-old office argument on what the ideal temperature should be. This smart watch claims to cool you down or warm you up without touching the thermostat.  Read more...

More about Mashable Video, Watch, Smart Home, Real Time, and Real Time Video


F-bombs on the starboard bow! 'Star Trek' swears for the first time ever

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It may still be seeking out strange new worlds, but it seems the ongoing mission of Star Trek now also includes strange new words.

Star Trek Discovery has warped out of FCC-controlled network space and into the neutral zone of the CBS All-Access streaming service. That allowed the writers to fire the famously strait-laced franchise's first ever F-bombs in Sunday night's episode — boldly going where even the movies haven't dared to go before. 

SEE ALSO: The 'Star Trek: Discovery' episode that changed the universe

The groundbreaking swears took place during a discussion about the mycelium network — an intergalactic stream of mushroom spores that the mystery ship Discovery uses to transport itself instantly anywhere in the universe. So far, it has only been able to do so by torturing a poor giant space-bound tardigradeRead more...

More about Star Trek, Star Trek Discovery, Entertainment, and Movies Tv Shows