This Day in History - HISTORY

Lincoln delivers Gettysburg Address
On November 19, 1863, at the dedication of a military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln delivers one of the most memorable speeches in American history. In just 272 words, Lincoln brilliantly and movingly reminded a war-weary public why ...


Soviet counterattack at Stalingrad
The Soviet Red Army under General Georgi Zhukov launches Operation Uranus, the great Soviet counteroffensive that turned the tide in the Battle of Stalingrad. On June 22, 1941, despite the terms of the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939, Nazi Germany launched a massive invasion against the USSR. Aided by its ...


Sadat visits Israel
In an unprecedented move for an Arab leader, Egyptian president Anwar el-Sadat travels to Jerusalem to seek a permanent peace settlement with Israel after decades of conflict. Sadat’s visit, in which he met with Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and spoke before the Knesset (Parliament), was ...


Pele scores 1,000th goal
Brazilian soccer great Pele scores his 1,000th professional goal in a game, against Vasco da Gama in Rio de Janeiro’s Maracana stadium. It was a major milestone in an illustrious career that included three World Cup championships. Pele, considered one of the greatest soccer players ever to take the ...


Chaplain Charles Watters receives Medal of Honor
For action this date, Chaplain (Major) Charles Watters of the 173rd Airborne Brigade is awarded the Medal of Honor. Chaplain Watters was serving with the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry when it conducted an attack against North Vietnamese forces entrenched on Hill 875 during the Battle of Dak To. ...


Cambodians appeal for help
Cambodians appeal to Saigon for help as communist forces move closer to Phnom Penh. Saigon officials revealed that in the previous week, an eight-person Cambodian delegation flew to the South Vietnamese capital to officially request South Vietnamese artillery and engineer support for beleaguered ...


Notre Dame and MSU play to a classic tie
On November 19, 1966, in college football, first-ranked Notre Dame and second-ranked Michigan State play to a 10-10 tie at Spartan Stadium. The Irish, per coach Ara Parseghian’s instructions, ran out the clock at the end of the game instead of passing to score and risking an interception. After the ...


James A. Garfield is born
On this day in 1831, future President James A. Garfield is born to an impoverished family near Cleveland, Ohio. He weighed a whopping 10 pounds at birth, was a voracious reader and, as a young boy, worked driving the teams of horses that pulled barges along canals. Garfield was a minister in the ...


Shane author Jack Schaefer is born
Jack Schaefer, the author of Shane, one of the most popular westerns of all time, is born in Cleveland, Ohio. During the first half of his life, Schaefer was a successful journalist, but Shane was his first attempt at a novel. Published in 1949, when ...


Poet and critic Allen Tate is born
On this day in 1899, poet and critic Allen Tate is born in Winchester, Kentucky. Tate attended Vanderbilt University, where he helped found a well-regarded poetry magazine called The Fugitive, along with poet John Crowe Ransom. The Fugitives, as the poets called themselves, advocated Southern ...


An arrest warrant is issued for Michael Jackson
Rumors had swirled around Michael Jackson since the first public allegations of sexual misconduct with a minor child were aired amidst a 1993 civil lawsuit that was eventually settled out of court. A decade later, on November 19, 2003, an embattled Jackson prepared to face criminal charges of a ...


One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest debuts
On this day in 1975, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, a film about a group of patients at a mental institution, opens in theaters. Directed by Milos Forman and based on a 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey, the film starred Jack Nicholson and was co-produced by the actor Michael Douglas. One ...


Thousands perish in St. Petersburg flood
On this day in 1824, a flood on the Neva River in Russia claims an estimated 10,000 lives. Winter came early to Russia in 1824. The very cold weather caused blocks of ice to form on the Neva River, near the city of St. Petersburg. Enough ice developed that the river’s flow was nearly stopped for ...


Patty Hearst out on bail
Patricia Campbell Hearst, a granddaughter of the legendary publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, is released on bail pending the appeal of her conviction for participating in a 1974 San Francisco bank robbery that was caught on camera. Hearst’s ordeal began on the night of February 4, 1974, ...


Reagan and Gorbachev hold their first summit meeting
For the first time in eight years, the leaders of the Soviet Union and the United States hold a summit conference. Meeting in Geneva, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev produced no earth-shattering agreements. However, the meeting boded well for the future, as the two men ...


Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
On this day in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivers what will become one of the most famous speeches in American history, at the dedication of the military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Using just 272 words, Lincolnarticulated themeaning of the Civil War for a public that had grown ...


Congress pleads for soldiers
On this day in 1776, Congress pleads for the states to send more soldiers to serve in the Continental Army, reminding them “how indispensable it is to the common safety, that they pursue the most immediate and vigorous measures to furnish their respective quotas of Troops for the new Army, as the ...


Hitler urges Spain to grab Gibraltar
On this day in 1940, Adolf Hitler tells Spanish Foreign Minister Serano Suner to make good on an agreement for Spain to attack Gibraltar, a British-controlled region. This would seal off the Mediterranean and trap British troops in North Africa. Spain had just emerged from a three-year (1936-39) ...


British pilot makes heroic rescue
In one of the most exciting episodes of the air war during World War I, the British airman Richard Bell Davies performs a daring rescue on November 19, 1915, swooping down in his plane to whisk a downed fellow pilot from behind the Turkish lines at Ferrijik Junction. A squadron commander in the ...


Chevy Cavalier heads to Japan
On this day in 1993, Toyota and General Motors sign an historic agreement: Beginning in 1996, GM will offer its bestselling Chevy Cavalier, refitted with right-hand drive, for sale in Japan. The Cavalier was one of the first American automobiles to hit the Japanese market. The agreement that ...


National Geographic Photo of the Day

Neon Nights

With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs. Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City.

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Sandy Oasis

Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, is a nation of tranquility, but Sandy Island takes it to another level. This speck of sand in the bright blue waters is constantly reshaped by the ocean and weather, and visitors to the cay are encouraged to make reservations. Your Shot photographer Matthew Wade captured this shot using a drone.

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Golden Hills

Your Shot photographer Hannah Overeem captured this shot of her dog, Badger, an Australian cattle dog, in Chino Hills, California. She writes that the contrast of the golden field and blue-and-white sky give this image a “surreal” look.

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Hidden Gem

Forged by the wear of water rushing over rocks, Olo Canyon in Arizona is concealed inside the Grand Canyon. Its alluring landscape includes natural springs and rocks shaped like cathedral amphitheaters.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "Are We Losing the Grand Canyon?"




Behind the Curtain

Circus performers in Hanoi, Vietnam, prepare for the show minutes before it gets under way. Nguyen Thi Thu Hiep, shown here stretching, is a contortionist. For extra money, she also performs at private parties and social events.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "A Life at the Circus: Going Behind the Curtain in Vietnam."




'You Dropped Something!'

Your Shot photographer Suyash Mehta gained a souvenir from a passing eagle in Satara, India: a long feather. India is home to nearly two dozen eagle species.

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City of Sun Showers

Even in a rainstorm, Paris lives up to its nickname of the City of Light, as sun streaks through storm clouds over the city in this image by Your Shot photographer Raffaele Tuzio.

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A Flash in the Distance

Flashes of lightning illuminate the night sky above Lake Ontario, as seen from an overlook in Lyndonville, New York—located about an hour from the Canadian border at Niagara Falls.

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Flood of Color

Floods bring a mosaic of color to the rice fields of Y Ty, Vietnam. The wet season typically lasts from May to June in the mountainous village.

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A Walk on the Wild Side

Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in China’s Wolong Nature Reserve. China has been creating reserves to restore and protect disappearing panda habitat and is now introducing captive-bred pandas into the wild.

See more pictures from the August 2016 feature story "Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side."




A Popular Perch

Birds gather on a rock formation—a popular attraction for both seabirds and people—at Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California. Your Shot photographer Laurence Norah writes that it’s “a wonderful place to get the sunset … A long exposure added a slightly surreal element to the shot.”

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High-Rise and Shine

The brightly colored lights of Shinjuku, a ward of Tokyo, Japan, glitter in this double exposure by Masayuki Yamashita. The district is a bustling hub and home to what’s known as the world’s busiest railway station: Shinjuku Station, through which millions of passengers pass daily.

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Whale of a Time

A whale shark—the biggest fish in the sea—swims along, “extremely curious” about his observers. Your Shot photographer David Robinson, who researches whale shark ecology, captured this image in Qatar on a day with “great visibility” in an area with waters that are usually full of plankton.

Robinson's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Life on Mars

Your Shot member Bryan Geiger’s early morning visit to the summit area of Haleakalā volcano in Hawaii’s Haleakalā National Park yielded this extraordinary image of an otherworldly landscape. “I woke up at 3 a.m. and drove to Haleakalā summit,” Geiger writes. “As the sun came up it revealed only a white wall of mist. After a couple of hours, disappointed and cold, I decided to leave. While driving back I jumped out at the overlook to see if anything had changed. At that moment the clouds retreated and I had only an instant to snap this photo of the [alien-looking] land.”

Geiger's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Western Spirit

Framing an expansive blue sky, desert buttes, and a pair of majestic horses, Your Shot member Nora Feddal captures the essence of the American West in this image made while visiting Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which extends into both Arizona and Utah.

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Night Falls

By day, the water of Arizona's Havasu Falls is a remarkable, bright blue-green. In this image submitted by Jes Stockhausen, it’s a milky ribbon, illuminated at night by the light of a camper’s headlamps. “While camping in the Havasupai [Indian Reservation], you hear the roar of the falls 24/7. My friend and I went to see if we could see the stars and were blown away [by] the sheer darkness of the canyon. This shot was [made] with two headlamps, one at the subject’s feet and one on his head.”

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First Light

Photographer Theerasak Saksritawee submitted this photo of birds taking flight in a golden sky over Taiwan’s National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall. The memorial, dedicated to the former president of the Republic of China, includes gardens, ponds, and this sprawling plaza, a popular spot for national celebrations.

Saksritawee's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen

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A Walk in the Park

Photographer Graham De Lacy captured this shot of an African elephant taking a sunny-day stroll in South Africa’s Madikwe Game Reserve. “[It was] one of the many close encounters … I’ve had the pleasure of experiencing,” De Lacy writes. African elephants are the largest land mammals on Earth.

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Pelican Party

Pelicans, seen from above in this aerial shot submitted by Your Shot community member Stas Bartnikas, congregate on the Colorado River in Mexico. The social birds usually travel in flocks and are found on many of the world’s coastlines and along lakes and rivers.

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Lifting the Veil

A lacy veil of cigarette smoke encircles a man in Sarawak, one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. “I embarked on photography trips to inland Sarawak to seek out the native people [who] preserve their way of life,” Your Shot member Jonathan Nyik Fui Tai says. ”Many of the tribes have slowly [been] assimilated into modern society.”

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Hot Rock

Spiking from inky storm clouds, a white-hot thunderbolt spears the plateau during a summer storm in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The monument comprises 300,000 unspoiled acres that cross both Arizona and Utah and contain steep cliffs, deep canyons, and sandstone formations.

Rankin’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Black Water

Seen from above, a small boat travels the Buriganga River, thick and dark with pollution, in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. Though the water is filled with human and industrial waste, millions depend on it for their livelihood and transportation. “The Buriganga is economically very important to Dhaka,” Your Shot photographer Jakir Hossain Rana writes. “Launches and country boats provide a connection to other parts of Bangladesh.”

Rana’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Rose-Tinted Spectacle

Sunset splashes a rosy tint over the landscape in this image submitted by Fabrizio Fortuna. The mountain is the 1,500-foot (457-meter) Vestrahorn, a main landmark of southeastern Iceland.

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Pushed for Time

“One of the best places [to photograph] in Cairo, Egypt, is the camels market,” writes Your Shot member Nader Saadallah. “At this moment, the camels’ keepers and sellers [are] trying to push the camel into their vehicle to send it to the local market to be slaughtered to be ready for customers.”

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Old Guard

“Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water,” Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty. “This place is magical.”

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists explain how wombats drop cubed feces
How do wombats produce cube-shaped feces? Scientists have investigated the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats' digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat.


New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review
Medical researchers have developed a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut.


Virtual reality simulation of a supermassive black hole
The black hole at the center of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, has been visualized in virtual reality for the first time.


A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis
Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers have identified a molecule that not only greatly reduces the progression of the disease but also boosts life expectancy in animal models by a factor of seven. Since the molecule -- known as tamoxifen -- is already used for breast cancer, the researchers hope to soon set up a clinical trial.


Spanking in developing countries does more harm than good, study suggests
Spanking may be increasingly harmful for children on a more global scale than previously known, a new study indicates.


Geneticist solves long-standing finch beak mystery
Biologist have compared the genes of large-beaked Cameroonian finches to those of their smaller-beaked counterparts, found the answer to a 20-year old mystery: 300,000 base pairs, apparently inherited as a unit, always varied between them, and right in the middle of that genetic sequence was the well-known growth factor, IGF-1.


Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity
The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which horticultural businesses were directly selling live plant products online, either through Amazon, Ebay, or from their own websites.


Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance
Researchers have discovered how to make 'superalloys' even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors.


Newborn babies' brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time
A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research. Babies use this sense of touch -- facial somatosensation -- to find and latch onto their mother's nipple, and should have this ability from birth. Premature babies often have difficulty feeding, and underdevelopment of their facial sensitivity may be one of the main causes.


Color coded: Matching taste with color
Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products.


Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution
Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial pathogens. One target for drug development might be a protein factor, DNA translocase Mfd, that enables bacteria to evolve rapidly by promoting mutations in many different bacterial species. This action speeds antibiotic resistance, including multi-drug resistance. Working on drugs to block Mfd and similar factors could be a revolutionary strategy to address the worldwide crisis of treatment-resistant infectious diseases.


A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery
For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how.


From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges
A surprising discovery about a failed pain drug -- and specifically, the pathway it targets, BH4 -- could have implications for autoimmunity and cancer. Neuroscientists report that BH4 also functions as a kind of immunological thermostat, raising and lowering the activity levels of T cells. Inhibiting BH4 could relieve atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, lupus, polyarthritis and inflammatory bowel disease; boosting it could help the immune system attack cancers.


Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars
Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research has found evidence that sometimes the lakes would take on so much water that they overflowed and burst from the sides of their basins, creating catastrophic floods that carved canyons very rapidly, perhaps in a matter of weeks.


Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation
Study confirms biological mechanism responsible for latent HIV reservoirs; suggests strategies for a functional HIV cure.


Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge
Scientists suggest that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviors later in life. Researchers have investigated the effects of communal rearing on competitive and exploratory behaviors in adult male house mice.


PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests
Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows.


Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease
While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research found that while all physical activity is beneficial, static activities -- such as strength training-- were more strongly associated with reducing heart disease risks than dynamic activities like walking and cycling.


How head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
Biologists reveal the hidden molecular basis of brain disorders and provide the first cell atlas of the hippocampus -- the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory -- as it is affected by traumatic brain injury. The researchers propose gene candidates for treating brain diseases associated with traumatic brain injury such as Alzheimer's disease and post-traumatic stress disorder.


Kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole redefined
In a landmark decision, representatives from 60 countries voted to redefine the International System of Units (SI), changing the world's definition of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, forever.


Half of the world's annual precipitation falls in just 12 days
Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided distribution of rain and snow is likely to become even more skewed, with half of annual precipitation falling in 11 days.


Playing high school football changes the teenage brain
A single season of high school football may cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study. A new type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed significant changes in the structure of the grey matter in the front and rear of the brain and changes to structures deep inside the brain.


Social isolation linked to higher risk of death
A large study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women.


Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness
How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomized trials, but is this really the only reliable way to evaluate treatment effectiveness, or could something be done differently? How can the effectiveness of a treatment method be evaluated in practice? Could some patients benefit from a treatment that does not cause a response in others? A new method now provides answers to these questions.


Proteins cooperate to break up energy structures in oxygen starved heart cells
Researchers found that the filamin A-Drp1 complex mediates mitochondrial fission in a mouse model of hypoxic heart cells. Results show that hypoxic stress brought about the interaction of filamin A with Drp1 and increased Drp1 activity in heart cells. This process led to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell senescence. Further investigation demonstrated that the drug cilnidipine suppressed Drp1-filamin A complex formation and preserved heart cell function.


Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions
Scientists have found evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps us understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed.


Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling
A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, Mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. Pentlandite had previously been known as a catalyst for hydrogen production. By adding a suitable solvent, the researchers successfully utilised it to convert carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide. The latter is a common source material in the chemical industry.


The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies
The paleontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. A study has now revealed that the daily activity of these insects modifies soil composition and therefore influences the results obtained in paleoclimatic studies. The researchers also found that the ants transport fossils.


Long-term exposure to road traffic noise may increase the risk of obesity
Long term exposure to road traffic noise is associated with increased risk of obesity.


Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks
The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study.


Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction
Population geneticists have found that eleven seal species only narrowly escaped extinction.


Controlling organ growth with light
In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists have enhanced the technique to stop organ-shaping processes in fruit fly embryos. Their results allow control over a crucial step in embryonic development.


Channels for the supply of energy
Scientists elucidate the mechanism for the transport of water-insoluble protein molecules in mitochondria.


3D chemical maps of single bacteria
Researchers used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution.


Gene editing possible for kidney disease
For the first time scientists have identified how to halt kidney disease in a life-limiting genetic condition, which may pave the way for personalised treatment in the future.


Predatory behavior of Florida's skull-collecting ant
New research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a Florida ant, Formica archboldi, that decorates its nest with the dismembered body parts of other ant species.


New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
Researchers have developed a new technique to analyze cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionize the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases.


Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality
Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study.


Severe eczema may best be treated by allergy shots
A medically-challenging case found that allergy shots provided significant benefits to the eczema symptoms suffered by a 48-year-old man.


Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1
New research found that over two percent of all US children under the age of 5 have a milk allergy, and 53 percent of food-allergic infants under age 1 have a cow's milk allergy.


Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies
New research suggests a link between parental sucking on a pacifier and a lower allergic response among young children.


Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from Okinawa rail (endangered species)
As part of the cellular conservation of endangered species, our group initiated a primary cell culture project aimed at preserving endangered avian species in Japan, such as the Okinawa rail. However, primary cells cannot be cultured indefinitely because of cellular senescence and stresses caused by cell culture. To overcome these cell culture limitations, primary cells must be immortalized. As a result, we succeeded to obtain the immortalized avian cells with cell cycle regulation genes expression.


Safest way to dine out for those with food allergies is using up to 15 strategies
New research examined what tools people who have food allergies use to prevent allergic reactions at restaurants.


Engineered DNA-encoded PCSK9 inhibitors may provide an effective alternative for treating high cholesterol
Researchers have developed novel synthetic DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) directed against PCSK9, a protein key to regulating cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Results of preclinical studies showed a significant cholesterol decrease, opening the door for further development of this approach as a simple, less frequent and cost-effective therapy.


Drop your weapons!
It takes energy to make weapons, but it may take even more energy to maintain them. Because leaf-footed bugs drop their legs, it is possible to measure how much energy they allocate to maintaining this appendage that males use to fight other males.


Climate, life and the movement of continents: New connections
A new study has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift.


Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies
A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve.


Metallic nanoparticles light up another path towards eco-friendly catalysts
Scientists have produced subnano-sized metallic particles that are very effective as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons. These catalysts can be as much as 50 times more effective than well-known Au-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts.


'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures
A 'smart skin' employs the unique fluorescent characteristics of carbon nanotubes to quickly assess strain in materials. The method is intended for aircraft, spacecraft and critical infrastructures in which mechanical strain needs to be monitored.


Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of premature birth
A new review has found that increasing the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature births.


Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion
The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. New research in mice shows that the sight and smell of food alone may be enough to kickstart processes in the liver that promote the digestion of food.


To monitor 'social jet lag,' scientists look to Twitter
Social jet lag -- a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body's internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules -- has been tied to obesity and other health problems. Now, researchers have found a clever way to measure social jet lag in people all over the country: by analyzing patterns of activity on the social media platform Twitter.


Gut hormone and brown fat interact to tell the brain it's time to stop eating
Researchers have shown that so-called 'brown fat' interacts with the gut hormone secretin in mice to relay nutritional signals about fullness to the brain during a meal. The study bolsters our understanding of a long-suspected role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) -- a type of body fat known to generate heat when an animal is cold -- in the control of food intake.


Human activity may influence the distribution and transmission of Bartonella bacteria
A new study suggests that humans play an important role in disease risk, infection patterns, and distribution of Bartonella, advancing current understanding of Bartonella's evolutionary history and how the bacteria may be transmitted between humans and other animal species.


HIV latency differs across tissues in the body
Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a new study. The findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV.


DICE: Immune cell atlas goes live
Scientists are sharing a trove of data that will be critical for deciphering how a natural genetic variation shapes the immune system's ability to protect our health.


Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab
New research has identified rogue cells -- namely brain and muscle cells -- lurking within kidney organoids. Such cells make up only 10 to 20 percent of an organoid's cells, but their presence indicates that the 'recipes' used to coax stem cells into becoming kidney cells inadvertently are churning out other cell types.


How electric fish got their big brains
Researchers have mapped the regions of the brain in mormyrid fish in extremely high detail. The new measurements can help illuminate longstanding questions in neuroanatomy. As brains get bigger, do all regions of the brain scale up in a predictable way? Or does natural selection act independently on separate regions of the brain -- such that certain parts of the brain become enlarged in animals that have extra reasons to use them?


Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus
Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet -- or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper, researchers with diverse expertise and perspectives on the issues laid out the case for each position and came to a consensus and a future research agenda.


New 'SLICE' tool can massively expand immune system's cancer-fighting repertoire
Researchers have devised a CRISPR-based system called SLICE, which will allow scientists to rapidly assess the function of each and every gene in 'primary' immune cells -- those drawn directly from patients. The new method, described in the Nov. 15 issue of Cell, provides researchers with a powerful tool that will guide their decision-making when determining how best to engineer immune cells to fight cancer and a host of other diseases.


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Watch this adorable little pika sing along to Queen

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Someone needs to sign this extremely talented pika to a label ASAP.

This adorable creature known as a pika is a species native to North America and Asia and is known for making the easily one most adorable squeaks ever. In this case, having the flawless ability to cover Queen. 

This video, uploaded by Joe Vevers to YouTube, samples Freddie Mercury singing "Ay-Oh" to an audience, and is perfectly synced it up with the Pika's mouth movements.

The result is a hilarious and endearing tribute to the legendary singer. Just be sure to have a box of tissues nearby because this cover bring you to tears in the best way possible. Read more...

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'Once Upon a Deadpool' trailer has a charity tie-in

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What's better than a Deadpool sequel? Two sequels, with different ratings, out in the same year! Once Upon A Deadpool will revisit Deadpool 2 "filtered through the prism of childlike innocence" – a.k.a. edited to fit a PG-13 rating.

Once Upon A Deadpool frames the previously explicit movie as a bedtime story Deadpool reads to Fred Savage – you know, like The Princess Bride. However, as Savage is quick to note, he's an adult man now, and the gimmick doesn't have the same heartwarming, family-friendly feeling (Deadpool has him tied up).

SEE ALSO: 10 gifts for the fan who has a love/hate relationship with Marvel Read more...

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Mark Zuckerberg believes Facebook is at 'war,' report says

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Mark Zuckerberg is feeling the heat.

According to a report from the Wall Street Journal, Facebook’s founder and CEO believes his company is currently at "war." The comment came from Mark Zuckerberg this past June in a meeting with a few dozen of Facebook’s top executives amid the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

In this same June meeting, Zuckerberg told executives that he was going to be taking a more active role in Facebook’s day-to-day operations. With the social media platform fighting on multiple fronts — between Congress, the press, and even his own executives — Zuckerberg clearly felt he needed to take a more active role. Read more...

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The best dating and hookup apps for you

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Hookup culture: also known as the thing that your parents and grandparents complain about because "nobody has a real conversation anymore." We all know that's not true. Online dating has had a massive impact on more people meeting and talking than ever before.

SEE ALSO: The most popular dating sites in the UK, just in time for cuffing season

And when we think about dating sites, we usually think about sites like eHarmony, Zoosk, and other marriage-minded options. But not every single person is thinking about marriage or a steady relationship though. Sometimes, you just wanna get laid.

Everyone gets stuck in a sexual rut at some point, and let's face it: Trying to take strangers home from a bar or constantly hitting up your ex who you know is DTF can get old.  Read more...

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5 of the best dating sites for introverts, wallflowers, and shy people

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Online dating is basically the best thing that ever happened to introverts.

You can now scan for a potential partner without ever leaving the comfort zone that is your sofa. Of course, eventually you'll need to get up and actually go on a date. But until then, scroll away my friend. After all, there are millions of people all around the planet who are now realising the strengths that introverts bring to the table.

SEE ALSO: The most popular dating sites in the UK, just in time for cuffing season

You can even say we're living through a worldwide Introvert Revolution. Just look at the success of self-proclaimed introvert Susan Cain's wildly popular book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. Her book has sold millions of copies worldwide, a TEDtalk she gave on the topic has been viewed over 20 million times, and she reportedly gets paid five-figures for a single appearance. Read more...

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The best dating sites to find a connection this weekend

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Ah, online dating. If you've dated in the past 20 years, you've likely encountered one – or all – of the myriad dating sites in some form. 

And as we've increasingly moved our lives online, digital dating has allowed us more freedom to meet others however we choose.

SEE ALSO: The most popular dating sites in the UK, just in time for cuffing season

With so many options, it can be really tricky knowing where to find the best crop of potential mates. Each of the dating apps out there has features that will matter differently to you depending on your lifestyle, what you want, and what's most important to you. Read more...

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YouTuber shares a touching reunion with his cat who survived wildfire

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YouTuber Hamish Patterson revealed in a heart wrenching new video on Sunday that his cat, Mike the mini puma, managed to survive the deadly California wildfire that ravaged Malibu.

In the video, Patterson shows his home completely destroyed by the wildfires, mourning the devastation.

"We found the cat," said Patterson tearfully as he holds onto Mike in the video. "My kitty made it." Read more...

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New 'Monopoly: Game of Thrones' edition plays the theme song while you monopolize

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There's a new version of Monopoly for Game of Thrones fans and this time it plays music.

The second edition of Monopoly: Game of Thrones is coming in January 2019 to make Game of Thrones fans angrier at each other than the television show ever could. Along with some aesthetic upgrades, the new edition of Monopoly: Game of Thrones includes an Iron Throne card holder that plays the Game of Thrones theme song while you play.

SEE ALSO: Someone at Hasbro apparently thought Monopoly for Millennials was a great idea

With Monopoly: Game of Thrones, players get to control their preferred houses and buy up land all around Westeros and Essos to screw over their opponents and eventually dominate the world through the power of unmitigated capitalism. Read more...

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This shapeshifting clock turns time into moving art

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London-based design studio Animaro built a kinetic clock that changes its shape depending on the time of the day. Instead of displaying minutes and seconds with precision, Solstice takes a more meditative approach to time and moves in a relaxing, eye-soothing way. Its retail price will be around $770, but you could get it for less until the 13th of December if you back its Kickstarter campaign. Read more...

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The Reebok Black Friday presale is now live

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We have made certain promises over the last few weeks. We have said, repeatedly, that we will keep on top of any and all of the Black Friday sale promotions. This isn't the beginning of a confession. We haven't missed anything. We are here to tell you that Reebok has dropped its Black Friday presale, and that we have continued to keep our promise.

Reebok has just gone live with a 30% off code that works on all outlet items and thousands of non-sale items too. The most important bit? The code. Enter BF30 at checkout to receive the discount. There is a wide range of quality products to pick from, in both the men's and women's outlets. Whether you need new shoes, new activewear, or new anything, visit the Reebok sale with a voucher code tucked into your back pocket and walk away happy. Read more...

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I love Dave Matthews Band but I have a hard time showing it

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Welcome to No Shame November! This week we're diving into the pop culture we love that society tells us we shouldn't.


I love Dave Matthews Band. They're my favorite band of all time, but sometimes I think that people will think less of me if I make that information public.

Over the years, fans of Dave Matthews Band have garnered a negative reputation: frat bros, sloppy drunks, and people who are more interested in partying than listening to music at shows. Sometimes I'm worried that if I wear a DMB shirt in public, people will think I'm one of them, and that's a bummer.

Now, don't feel bad for me. As a straight, white, cis man, this is pretty much the biggest social hardship I face in my life, and it doesn't actually stop me from enjoying this band that I've followed since I was a kid. Read more...

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Curling team gets kicked out of tournament for being way too drunk

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Curling further cemented its legend as a completely underrated sport over the weekend when organizers had to kick out an entire team from a competition in Canada for being way too drunk.

The incident happened on Sunday at the Red Deer Curling Classic in Red Deer, Alberta and the booted foursome included Ryan Fry, who was a member of Canada's 2014 Olympic gold medal-winning squad. 

Organizers fielded multiple complaints about the foursome's behavior resulting in their ejection from the rink and the tournamentSpeaking to the CBC, Wade Thurber, facility manager at the Red Deer Curling Centre, said "they were extremely drunk and breaking brooms and swearing and just unacceptable behavior." Read more...

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Mods don't add much to the Moto Z3— Power Up

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Motorola's Moto Z3 has plenty of mods to adapt your phone into your ideal device. With a super AMOLED screen and a sleek glass and metal build, this phone sure is easy on the eyes. One of the biggest draw backs of this phone is the button placement, which is all over the place. Seriously, who needs a fingerprint reader on the side of a phone? If you can get past the average functional features, this phone might be your perfect match. Alix Aspe has all of the details on mods, battery life, and other capabilities on this week's episode of Power Up. Read more...

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This bookstore just sold a book that had been on a shelf for nearly 28 years

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Indie bookshops are often great places for book lovers to browse for hidden gems. Some gems, though, remain hidden for a pretty long time before anyone picks them up and gives them a home.

Broadhurst's Bookshop, an independent bookshop in the English town of Southport, just sold such a gem after having kept it on their shelves for nearly 28 years. 

SEE ALSO: 10 books by women who are changing the world

The tweet announcing the sale currently has 134,000 likes. 

I have just sold a book that we have had in stock since May 1991. We always knew its day would come.

— Broadhursts Bookshop (@BroadhurstBooks) November 17, 2018 Read more...

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Save big on TicWatch smartwatches in the Amazon Black Friday UK sale

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It's been established for a while now that we are already living in the future. Nearly everything is automated and cars are practically driving themselves. And oh yeah, there's a robot dog empire on the rise, turning Black Mirror scenarios into a reality.

Life isn't always a terrifying dystopian nightmare come true however. There are so many ways the advancement in technology is making our lives easier and better. Smartwatches are a great example of this. You can now organise your life, stay healthy, and tell the time all at once without an evil robot dog in sight. 

There are also great opportunities to save big on smartwatches right now, particularly in Amazon's Black Friday sale. You can pick up a wide range of smartwatches from TicWatch, with a model perfect for everyone. Read more...

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BBC crew interrupt filming to rescue penguins in latest David Attenborough show

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One particular scene had people on the edge of their seats during the latest episode of BBC's latest David Attenborough nature documentary, Dynasties. 

It followed a group of emperor penguins trying to survive the brutal winter in Antarctica. When a particularly nasty storm blew some of the penguins down into a ravine with walls too steep for them to climb, things got almost too real. 

SEE ALSO: David Attenborough's latest nature show has a brilliantly original twist

Some penguin mothers abandoned their chicks as they pecked their way out of the ravine, while others were just hopelessly stuck without hope of getting out.  Read more...

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Best online mattresses in the UK, ranked: Casper, Nectar, Leesa, and more

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Sleep can make or break your day. If you wake up feeling energised and refreshed, concentrating and functioning will be a breeze. On the other hand, if you spend most of your nights tossing and turning, the whole day can feel like a challenge. You’ll be fatigued, irritable, and reaching for the nearest caffeine source. 

According to the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, sleep deprivation might lead to serious health problems, including diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and obesity. So it’s something to take seriously. If you need to improve your quality of sleep, it might be time for you to buy a new mattress.  Read more...

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The best Black Friday and Cyber Monday Amazon.co.uk deals

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The Amazon.co.uk Black Friday Sale is running until Nov. 25, and there are literally thousands of deals on the latest consumer electronics and Amazon devices as well as on toys, games, fashion, jewellery, beauty, homeware, and basically everything you could ever want. There's already been some amazing deals and we are only a few days into the sale. There will be plenty more, trust us on that.

As usual, there are also thousands of "Lightning Deals" — products available at a discount, in limited quantities, for a short period of time — with new deals becoming available as often as every five minutes. You'll have to be quick on the trigger to snag these offers, though. There, we've warned you! Read more...

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You'll never pop bubble wrap again after this episode of 'Doctor Who'

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Great, even everyday postage items are no longer safe. 

In the latest episode of Doctor Who, bubble wrap, which you've likely popped with copious amounts of glee, has been rendered a fearsome, transparent temptation of doom. 

SEE ALSO: 'Doctor Who' fans are so into this cute, hangry creature called a 'Pting'

In the sixth episode of Series 11 "Kerblam!," the Doctor, Graham, Yaz, and Ryan visit the warehouse of Kerblam, the galaxy's largest retailer (and a subtle dig at Amazon).

Without giving too much away, this is what bubble wrap from Kerblam can do to you:

People lost their minds over this terrible, poppable new threat. Read more...

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Turn your iPhone into a 360-degree 4K camera with this pre-Black Friday sale

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From portrait mode to time lapse, the iPhone camera can surely hold its own, especially compared to its flip-phone predecessors and their potato-quality pics. Really, it's no wonder no one's buying digital cameras anymore. Why spend extra cash on a gadget that only takes pictures when your current phone can already do so, and just as well? 

SEE ALSO: All the best Black Friday 2018 sales, right in one place

Still, there's one feature Apple has yet to add to its smartphones' cameras, and that's the ability to take quality 360-degree footage. As for filling that void, you have two options:

1. You can drop a couple hundred dollars on a handheld VR camera, or Read more...

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John Oliver's latest deep dive takes a look at 1 very troubling global trend

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If you thought John Oliver was going to pick a lighter topic to round off his most recent series, you'd be wrong.

Yep: the latest issue up for discussion is the fairly unnerving global trend of countries electing authoritarian leaders to power — from Vladimir Putin's ongoing reign in Russia to Brazil's recent appointment of the far-right politician Jair Bolsonaro.

In the clip above, Oliver breaks down exactly what makes an "authoritarian" leader — from projecting strength and demonising enemies to the dismantling of institutions.

And guess who it all comes back to in the end? Yep, Trump.

"The world is dabbling with something very dangerous right now, and America needs to be careful," concludes Oliver. "And look, I know democracy can be, often by design, frustrating. Checks and balances can be irritating and slow, and might not deliver the outcome you wanted.  Read more...

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The best Black Friday and Cyber Monday laptop deals in the UK

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Black Friday and Cyber Monday are good for many, many things. If there is something you really want, particularly if it's in the tech world, then there is likely to be an offer available over this period.

When it comes to laptops and tablets, Black Friday and Cyber Monday are invariably the best times to grab a great deal. So if someone you know has a laptop or tablet on their Christmas list, your old device is on its last legs, or you simply fancy an upgrade, you are best off being prepared for Black Friday. You need to figure out what you want, work out what constitutes a good deal, and wait for the right time to strike. Or alternatively, you could visit this page where we do the hard-work for you. Read more...

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Want to hydrate like Beyoncé? Pick up this alkaline water bottle that just went on sale.

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Forget Hansel — alkaline water is so hot right now. Reportedly guzzled by the likes of Beyoncé, Tom Brady, and Miranda Kerr, alkaline water is a pH-basic version of regular tap water that is said to balance your body chemistry, keep you better hydrated, clear up your skin, boost your immunity, and neutralize free radicals within your system.

Is it for real, or is it all hype? One way to decide would be to drink some for yourself.

Here's the thing, though: If you want to hydrate like the rich and famous, you tend to have to spend like them, too. That means forking over anywhere from $200 to $2,000 to install a water ionizing machine in your home — and unless you're Queen Bey herself, making that kind of purchase is out of the question. Read more...

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Black Friday 2018 UK deals: where to find the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals

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If you are based in the US, please visit this page for the best Black Friday deals from across the pond.

Black Friday is almost definitely the biggest shopping day of the year. It's not uncommon to see queues lining up around shopping centres and if you can believe it, even the odd scuffle break out as shoppers contest for the best deals.

You could also do your Black Friday shopping online and avoid all that but who are we to judge?

Black Friday is fast approaching and presents the perfect opportunity for you to grab some amazing deals.

Here’s your guide on how to make the best of Black Friday 2018. Read more...

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Finns troll Trump with photos of themselves raking leaves

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Donald Trump's comment about raking leaves has left some Finns scratching their heads.

It comes after a visit to the fire-ravaged Paradise in California on Saturday, where Trump suggested people could be cleaning up leaves to prevent blazes.

SEE ALSO: When will this terrible wildfire season in California end?

"You look at other countries where they do it differently and it’s a whole different story. I was with the President of Finland and he said we are a forest nation. He called it a forest nation," Trump told reporters. 

"And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don't have any problem." Read more...

More about California, Culture, Trump, Finland, and California Wildfires


These 14 giant uterus sculptures show you the journey from conception to birth

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Want to know what the uterus looks like in the various stages before a baby is born? Yeah, you do.

British artist Damien Hirst has officially unveiled 14 colossal bronze uterus sculptures outside a hospital in Qatar, graphically documenting the stages from conception to birth.

The gigantic bronze work is called The Miraculous Journey, and begins with the fertilization of an egg, depicts various stages of a fetus growing inside the uterus, and culminates in a 46-foot baby. 

Each sculpture ranges from 5 to 11 metres (16 to 36 feet) in height and the whole thing weighs a massive 216 metric tonnes.  Read more...

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Apple's Tim Cook warns regulation is coming for the tech industry

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This year has been horrendous for Silicon Valley's public image.

With a litany of issues like data misuse and political interference laid bare within the last 12 months, Apple CEO Tim Cook told Axios on HBO that government regulation of the tech industry is "inevitable."

SEE ALSO: Facebook's former security chief stands up for the social network, calls for change

"Generally speaking, I am not a big fan of regulation," he said in an interview from Apple's headquarters in Cupertino.

"I'm a big believer in the free market. But we have to admit when the free market is not working. And it hasn't worked here. I think it's inevitable that there will be some level of regulation ... I think the Congress and the administration at some point will pass something."  Read more...

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'Shrek Retold' is a bizarre fan-made remake of the classic animated film

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Nearly 20 years on and several disappointing sequels later, Shrek is still on our minds.

As it has been for over 200 people, who have contributed to a huge and very weird project called Shrek Retold, a scene-by-scene remake of the 1999 film.

Behind it all is 3GI, the team responsible for the annual festival dedicated to the cantankerous ogre, Shrekfest. A mix of animation, bizarre 3D renderings, and live action scenes, the film's trailer really speaks for itself.

Shrek Retold is set to be released on 3GI's YouTube channel on Nov. 29. Read more...

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Facebook's former security chief stands up for the social network, calls for change

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Facebook's former chief security officer is defending the social network amid the fallout from the New York Times’ bombshell report on the company this past week.

Alex Stamos, who was the company’s CSO from 2015 up until the summer of 2018, wrote a piece published in the Washington Post on Saturday responding to the New York Times report. Stamos attempted to dispel the Times’ report claiming that Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, fearing blowback, delayed taking action following his team’s discovery of Russian interference in the 2016 election via a misinformation campaign on the platform. Read more...

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Donald Trump dropped a big 'Schitt' after dismissing a U.S. hero's military service

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It's the afternoon of a day ending with "y," so you know Donald Trump has offended someone already.

Look no further than Trump's Fox News interview with Chris Wallace. A clip from that interview went viral earlier on Sunday when Wallace asked the president to respond to comments by Bill McRaven, the former Navy SEAL who oversaw the operation the ended in the death of Osama Bin Laden.

SEE ALSO: Jimmy Kimmel has a better version of that wild 'Trumpy Bear' ad

McRaven had previously criticized Trump's frequent attacks against the media — specifically, his characterization of the press as "the enemy of the people" — as "the greatest threat to democracy" he's ever witnessed. The former SEAL spoke up again in August after Trump's apparently punitive revocation of former CIA director John Brennan's security clearance. Read more...

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