History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

August 20, 1911: First around-the-world telegram sent, 66 years before Voyager II launch

On this day in 1911, a dispatcher in the New York Times office sends the first telegram around the world via commercial service. Exactly 66 years later, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sends a different kind of message–a phonograph record containing information about Earth for extraterrestrial beings–shooting into space aboard the unmanned spacecraft Voyager II.

The Times decided to send its 1911 telegram in order to determine how fast a commercial message could be sent around the world by telegraph cable. The message, reading simply “This message sent around the world,” left the dispatch room on the 17th floor of the Times building in New York at 7 p.m. on August 20. After it traveled more than 28,000 miles, being relayed by 16 different operators, through San Francisco, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Saigon, Singapore, Bombay, Malta, Lisbon and the Azores–among other locations–the reply was received by the same operator 16.5 minutes later. It was the fastest time achieved by a commercial cablegram since the opening of the Pacific cable in 1900 by the Commercial Cable Company.

On August 20, 1977, a NASA rocket launched Voyager II, an unmanned 1,820-pound spacecraft, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. It was the first of two such crafts to be launched that year on a “Grand Tour” of the outer planets, organized to coincide with a rare alignment of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Aboard Voyager II was a 12-inch copper phonograph record called “Sounds of Earth.” Intended as a kind of introductory time capsule, the record included greetings in 60 languages and scientific information about Earth and the human race, along with classical, jazz and rock ‘n’ roll music, nature sounds like thunder and surf, and recorded messages from President Jimmy Carter and other world leaders.

The brainchild of astronomer Carl Sagan, the record was sent with Voyager II and its twin craft, Voyager I–launched just two weeks later–in the faint hope that it might one day be discovered by extraterrestrial creatures. The record was sealed in an aluminum jacket that would keep it intact for 1 billion years, along with instructions on how to play the record, with a cartridge and needle provided.

More importantly, the two Voyager crafts were designed to explore the outer solar system and send information and photographs of the distant planets to Earth. Over the next 12 years, the mission proved a smashing success. After both crafts flew by Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager I went flying off towards the solar system’s edge while Voyager II visited Uranus, Neptune and finally Pluto in 1990 before sailing off to join its twin in the outer solar system.

Thanks to the Voyager program, NASA scientists gained a wealth of information about the outer planets, including close-up photographs of Saturn’s seven rings; evidence of active geysers and volcanoes exploding on some of the four planets’ 22 moons; winds of more than 1,500 mph on Neptune; and measurements of the magnetic fields on Uranus and Neptune. The two crafts are expected to continue sending data until 2020, or until their plutonium-based power sources run out. After that, they will continue to sail on through the galaxy for millions of years to come, barring some unexpected collision.



National Geographic Photo of the Day

Neon Nights

With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs. Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City.

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Sandy Oasis

Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, is a nation of tranquility, but Sandy Island takes it to another level. This speck of sand in the bright blue waters is constantly reshaped by the ocean and weather, and visitors to the cay are encouraged to make reservations. Your Shot photographer Matthew Wade captured this shot using a drone.

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Golden Hills

Your Shot photographer Hannah Overeem captured this shot of her dog, Badger, an Australian cattle dog, in Chino Hills, California. She writes that the contrast of the golden field and blue-and-white sky give this image a “surreal” look.

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Hidden Gem

Forged by the wear of water rushing over rocks, Olo Canyon in Arizona is concealed inside the Grand Canyon. Its alluring landscape includes natural springs and rocks shaped like cathedral amphitheaters.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "Are We Losing the Grand Canyon?"




Behind the Curtain

Circus performers in Hanoi, Vietnam, prepare for the show minutes before it gets under way. Nguyen Thi Thu Hiep, shown here stretching, is a contortionist. For extra money, she also performs at private parties and social events.

See more pictures from the September 2016 story "A Life at the Circus: Going Behind the Curtain in Vietnam."




'You Dropped Something!'

Your Shot photographer Suyash Mehta gained a souvenir from a passing eagle in Satara, India: a long feather. India is home to nearly two dozen eagle species.

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City of Sun Showers

Even in a rainstorm, Paris lives up to its nickname of the City of Light, as sun streaks through storm clouds over the city in this image by Your Shot photographer Raffaele Tuzio.

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A Flash in the Distance

Flashes of lightning illuminate the night sky above Lake Ontario, as seen from an overlook in Lyndonville, New York—located about an hour from the Canadian border at Niagara Falls.

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Flood of Color

Floods bring a mosaic of color to the rice fields of Y Ty, Vietnam. The wet season typically lasts from May to June in the mountainous village.

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A Walk on the Wild Side

Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in China’s Wolong Nature Reserve. China has been creating reserves to restore and protect disappearing panda habitat and is now introducing captive-bred pandas into the wild.

See more pictures from the August 2016 feature story "Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side."




A Popular Perch

Birds gather on a rock formation—a popular attraction for both seabirds and people—at Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California. Your Shot photographer Laurence Norah writes that it’s “a wonderful place to get the sunset … A long exposure added a slightly surreal element to the shot.”

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High-Rise and Shine

The brightly colored lights of Shinjuku, a ward of Tokyo, Japan, glitter in this double exposure by Masayuki Yamashita. The district is a bustling hub and home to what’s known as the world’s busiest railway station: Shinjuku Station, through which millions of passengers pass daily.

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Whale of a Time

A whale shark—the biggest fish in the sea—swims along, “extremely curious” about his observers. Your Shot photographer David Robinson, who researches whale shark ecology, captured this image in Qatar on a day with “great visibility” in an area with waters that are usually full of plankton.

Robinson's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Life on Mars

Your Shot member Bryan Geiger’s early morning visit to the summit area of Haleakalā volcano in Hawaii’s Haleakalā National Park yielded this extraordinary image of an otherworldly landscape. “I woke up at 3 a.m. and drove to Haleakalā summit,” Geiger writes. “As the sun came up it revealed only a white wall of mist. After a couple of hours, disappointed and cold, I decided to leave. While driving back I jumped out at the overlook to see if anything had changed. At that moment the clouds retreated and I had only an instant to snap this photo of the [alien-looking] land.”

Geiger's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




Western Spirit

Framing an expansive blue sky, desert buttes, and a pair of majestic horses, Your Shot member Nora Feddal captures the essence of the American West in this image made while visiting Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which extends into both Arizona and Utah.

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Night Falls

By day, the water of Arizona's Havasu Falls is a remarkable, bright blue-green. In this image submitted by Jes Stockhausen, it’s a milky ribbon, illuminated at night by the light of a camper’s headlamps. “While camping in the Havasupai [Indian Reservation], you hear the roar of the falls 24/7. My friend and I went to see if we could see the stars and were blown away [by] the sheer darkness of the canyon. This shot was [made] with two headlamps, one at the subject’s feet and one on his head.”

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First Light

Photographer Theerasak Saksritawee submitted this photo of birds taking flight in a golden sky over Taiwan’s National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall. The memorial, dedicated to the former president of the Republic of China, includes gardens, ponds, and this sprawling plaza, a popular spot for national celebrations.

Saksritawee's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




A Walk in the Park

Photographer Graham De Lacy captured this shot of an African elephant taking a sunny-day stroll in South Africa’s Madikwe Game Reserve. “[It was] one of the many close encounters … I’ve had the pleasure of experiencing,” De Lacy writes. African elephants are the largest land mammals on Earth.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




Pelican Party

Pelicans, seen from above in this aerial shot submitted by Your Shot community member Stas Bartnikas, congregate on the Colorado River in Mexico. The social birds usually travel in flocks and are found on many of the world’s coastlines and along lakes and rivers.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




Lifting the Veil

A lacy veil of cigarette smoke encircles a man in Sarawak, one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. “I embarked on photography trips to inland Sarawak to seek out the native people [who] preserve their way of life,” Your Shot member Jonathan Nyik Fui Tai says. ”Many of the tribes have slowly [been] assimilated into modern society.”

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Hot Rock

Spiking from inky storm clouds, a white-hot thunderbolt spears the plateau during a summer storm in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The monument comprises 300,000 unspoiled acres that cross both Arizona and Utah and contain steep cliffs, deep canyons, and sandstone formations.

Rankin’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Black Water

Seen from above, a small boat travels the Buriganga River, thick and dark with pollution, in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. Though the water is filled with human and industrial waste, millions depend on it for their livelihood and transportation. “The Buriganga is economically very important to Dhaka,” Your Shot photographer Jakir Hossain Rana writes. “Launches and country boats provide a connection to other parts of Bangladesh.”

Rana’s shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen.

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Rose-Tinted Spectacle

Sunset splashes a rosy tint over the landscape in this image submitted by Fabrizio Fortuna. The mountain is the 1,500-foot (457-meter) Vestrahorn, a main landmark of southeastern Iceland.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




Pushed for Time

“One of the best places [to photograph] in Cairo, Egypt, is the camels market,” writes Your Shot member Nader Saadallah. “At this moment, the camels’ keepers and sellers [are] trying to push the camel into their vehicle to send it to the local market to be slaughtered to be ready for customers.”

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




Old Guard

“Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water,” Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty. “This place is magical.”

This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>




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Mashable

The 'hurt me' meme is a weirdly enjoyable way to confront your deepest fears

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What would hurt you the most? If you said being confronted with your deep-seated insecurities, we have a meme for you. 

The "hurt me" meme is here to bare every upsetting truth or fear you might have. Fun, right?

It begins in the bedroom with a simple prompt: "hurt me." But instead of responding with an act of physical pain, your imaginary partner says something that cuts you to your core.

SEE ALSO: Remembering Advice Animals, one of the internet's first viral memes

me during sex: hurt me

them: you were never that smart you just were good at reading as a child so you were given special attention and it gave you a complex

me: wait-

them: you don’t try at school because youre convinced ur natural intellect will save you but u don’t have it

— Minna (@minnascule) August 19, 2018 Read more...

More about Twitter, Memes, Meme Culture, Culture, and Web Culture


This Vizio smart TV is your reason to stop mourning the end of summer: It's on sale for $70 off

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Alright real talk. As much as we're not yet willing to admit it, the days are getting shorter by the second as August is coming to a close. We'll miss the whimsical, sunshine-filled days of summer, but as one season comes to an end, another begins and brings its own perks. 

What some of you might refer to as fall and winter, I like to call "chill season." Not just because it's colder, but because it's the perfect excuse to sit back, vegetate, and catch up on all of the TV series you neglected when you were too busy sipping margaritas outside.

If you're gonna do it though, you need to do it right. Which is why we're lovin' on Walmart for catering to our basic needs and taking $70 off this VIZIO 50-inch Class SmartCast D-Series LED TVRead more...

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Water will never be boring again with this infuser bottle

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The Live Infinitely Infuser Water Bottle brings the natural flavors of your favorite fruits and citruses to your drinking water. The bottle is BPA-free and was designed to also be used for making tea and mixed drinks
Heads up: All products featured here are selected by Mashable's commerce team and meet our rigorous standards for awesomeness. If you buy something, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. Read more...

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Goats continue world domination by taking over New York City subway tracks

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Not to be dramatic or anything, but goats continue to conspire against humanity — this time against the people of New York. 

Following their massive takeover in Boise, Idaho, goats in New York City attempted to interfere with the already failing subway system on Monday morning when two goats somehow stumbled onto some above-ground train tracks in Brooklyn. The pair were spotted on the N line track, just chilling out and being goats.

SEE ALSO: How the work-life balance of one IT guy threw the NYC subway system into chaos

A new one for us (we think): Two goats are roaming along the N line tracks in Brooklyn. They’re safe and not currently affecting service, but they are on the run. We’ll keep you posted.

— NYCT Subway (@NYCTSubway) August 20, 2018 Read more...

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Cool off with this watermelon keg

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The newest party accessory is a tappable watermelon. Who knew?

Heads up: All products featured here are selected by Mashable's commerce team and meet our rigorous standards for awesomeness. If you buy something, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission. Read more...

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Learn to use Python by taking this online class that's on sale for £9.99

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Bootcamps conjure up ideas of sweaty limbs and gasping for breath — an image that often includes a soundtrack of grunts. 

Not all bootcamps are quite so uncomfortable however, and some can be undertaken from the safety of your sofa. No this isn't a get-fit-quick program that'll trim your waist for the beach; it's the Python Bootcamp, obviously. 

SEE ALSO: Save up to 90% on thousands of online courses from Udemy

If you have never programmed before, then you probably won't know what Python is. That's ok — there is still time. The Complete Python Bootcamp teaches you about the advanced features of Python to a professional standard, including both Python 2 and Python 3. Read more...

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VR is helping amputees feel their prosthetics as if they belonged to their bodies

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Researchers at EPFL developed a system that combines virtual reality with artificial tactile sensations to help amputees feel their prosthetics as if they are a part of their body. Read more...

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David Hogg plans to run for Congress when he turns 25 years old

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David Hogg, one of the powerful young activists who recently graduated from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, has dreams of one day running for Congress.

In an in-depth profile of the 18-year-old, New York Magazine's Daily Intelligencer reports that not only does Hogg want to enter politics, but he plans to do so soon — when he turns 25 years old.

SEE ALSO: Here's how to take action on gun control

Since the February 14 mass shooting at his high school in Parkland, Florida where 17 people were killed, Hogg's joined forces with fellow classmates like Emma González and Cameron Kasky to call for stricter gun control policies and to ensure this tragedy isn't soon forgotten. Read more...

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6 sexy movie and TV moments that aren't sex

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It’s Summer Lovin’ Week here at Mashable, which means things are getting steamy. In honor of the release of Crazy Rich Asians, we’re celebrating onscreen love and romance, looking at everything from our favorite fictional couples to how Hollywood’s love stories are evolving. Think of it as our love letter to, well, love.

Sometimes movie sex is kind of sexy! Sometimes it is not. It's kind of a toss-up. What's fascinating is that in movies where romance is the air, there are moments between romantic couples that read as very, very sexy...but they have nothing to do with sex. These longing looks, glancing touches, and sweet gestures are the things that real relationships are often build up, and it would be remiss to celebrate Summer Lovin' Week without listing a few of those magic moments that are so, so sexy...and yet entirely divorced from the bedroom.  Read more...

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Best TV deals this week: Save on the newest 4K smart TVs from Sony, Samsung, VIZIO, LG, RCA, and more

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Each week we comb through top retailers like Amazon, Walmart, and Target to find the best deals on name brand HD and 4K televisions — such as Sony, Samsung, and LG Electronics — in various shapes and sizes.  

SEE ALSO: Save $69 on a wireless Bluetooth speaker that also charges your devices

The biggest TV on the list this week is an 86-inch 4K HDR Smart LED UHD TV with AI ThinQ from LG Electronics, which is priced at $3,496.99. That's over $1000 off its retail price! 

There are TVs that are 60-70 inches big, such as Hisense's 60-inch Class UHD Smart DLED TV, on sale for the low price of $398.00, and Sony's 75-inch Class 4K Smart LED TV, which is going for $1,998.00. In addition, you can get a $20 credit from VUDU with the purchase of Samsung's 75-inch Class 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV, which is on sale for $1,597.99. Read more...

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Simulation report: Elon Musk unfollowed Grimes on Twitter

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It appears that Elon Musk no longer follows Grimes on Twitter. Time to freak out!

The Tesla CEO, who's been in headlines lately for stuff like tweeting himself into a probable SEC investigation and calling a hero a "pedophile," unfollowed his girlfriend on Sunday, bringing the number of women Musk follows down to three.

SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's muskiest moments of 2018, so far

Of course, breakup rumors are now flying, but Musk's behavior on the platform has been so erratic lately that this surprise unfollow could mean nothing. It could mean everything. It could mean that he was looking at Grimes's profile fondly one night while he was definitely not hiding from Azealia Banks and accidentally hit the "unfollow" button.  Read more...

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These football fans made the cutest gesture for kids visiting from the hospital

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While some football fans are known for loud and rowdy behaviour in the stands, these Dutch fans are here to win our hearts with some seriously cute stadium behaviour.

Supporters attending the Feyenoord vs. Excelsior match in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, gave a group of young visitors from a children's hospital a special treat on Sunday.

SEE ALSO: The website for Vermont's 14-year-old gubernatorial candidate has convinced me he's fit for the job

Here's a video of the moment fans in the top level of the stands rained down stuffed toys onto the children below, who were visiting from Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital. Read more...

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This Java Masterclass course is an absolute steal at under £10

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Someone who is able to code with confidence is automatically an impressive figure. Someone who is able to build creative and advanced programs across multiple computing platforms is out-of-this-world impressive. Those are the rules: programming talent equals jaws on the floor. 

So you are probably already a pretty impressive specimen, that goes without saying — but if you are interested in taking the next step on the road to professional success then the Complete Java Masterclass being offered for just £9.99 (down from £29.99) may be right for you.

Over 230,000 students have already enrolled in the course designed to give you the key skills required to program for big clients, as a travelling freelancer or from home.  Read more...

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Apple removes 25,000 illegal gambling apps from its Chinese App Store

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Apple is removing a slew of apps from its App Store in China in order to comply with the country’s strict regulations.

According to Chinese state broadcaster China Central Television or CCTV, Apple has removed 25,000 gambling apps from its Chinese App Store. This move comes after a number of Chinese media outlets lobbed complaints at the tech giant last month for allegedly allowing gambling, pornography, and counterfeit goods promotions in its App Store. 

SEE ALSO: Apple iCloud data in China now stored by state-owned company

State-controlled media had claimed that these gambling and lottery apps were not only illegal, but fake as well, resulting enormous losses for people who were scammed. Read more...

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Save up to 60% on Nerf blasters and more to celebrate Nerf Fest 2018

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While Hasbro offers a slew of popular toys, nothing quite matches up to the popularity of their Nerf line, which includes things like foam footballs and dart guns. But if you like the brand and want to load up, it can get a bit pricey.

Well good news: Nerf Fest has started on Amazon and if you are looking to grab some Nerf gear, now is the time to do so.

SEE ALSO: Super Soaker who? The next generation of water guns is here on Kickstarter.

Nerf toys can be split into two categories — Nerf blasters and everything else. If you are looking for something on the smaller side, there's the Nerf Doomlands 2169 Persuader Blaster that's $10.49 right now, down from the normal $15 price tag. The Doomlands is a very basic blaster, sporting four slits for small darts to pop in and fire quickly.  Read more...

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Apple is smartly removing another useless Apple Watch feature

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Apple is removing yet another Apple Watch feature when watchOS 5, the next version of the smartwatch's operating system, arrives this fall.

The next feature to be cut from the operating system: Time Travel. What the hell is Time Travel, you ask? Exactly.

SEE ALSO: Fitbit's new Charge 3 fitness tracker lasts up to 7 days on a single charge

Apple introduced Time Travel in watchOS 2 as a way for users to quickly see past and future events.

With a turn of the Apple Watch's Digital Crown, you were able to see things like the weather forecast on a per hour basis and upcoming calendar events.

Time Travel seemed like a cool way to digest a lot of information at a glance, but a few things spelled its inevitable death. Read more...

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The history of video game sex scenes is incredibly unsexy

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It turns out that making video game assets look sexy and not undeniably awkward is a lot harder than one would expect. Take a journey through time as we look at the history of sex and nudity in video games and how it still looks uncomfortable, even today.

Warning: This video contains images that may not be safe for work. Read more...

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14 wonderfully strange names for groups of animals

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A quiver of cobras. A huddle of walruses. Can you guess the names of these groups of animals? Read more...

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New Apple Watch models are likely coming soon

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Apple is probably preparing to launch new Apple Watch models, according to a new filing in the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) database. 

The filing, noticed by French outlet Consomac, lists a total of six new Watch models, all of which will be coming with Apple's upcoming watchOS 5 operating system for wearables. 

SEE ALSO: Food is actually being served on iPads and it's my nightmare

The model names for the upcoming watches are A1977, A1978, A1975, A1976, A2007 and A2008, which likely represents the entire Apple Watch Series 4 lineup. This is interesting, as the Apple Watch Series 3 lineup consists of a total of 8 models (actually four, but each comes in two sizes): The GPS-only aluminum variant and the three 4G+GPS variants, in aluminum, steel and ceramic.  Read more...

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Cherries are the internet's most desirable fruit this summer

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Cherries have been crowned the fruit of the summer. (Sorry you had to find out this way, other fruits.)

Cherry printed clothing, cherry-inspired accessories, and cherry red hues have been dominating the fashion world for months now. 

SEE ALSO: Meet the YouTuber who's been making musical instruments out of produce for 11 years

Back in April, the Strategist called attention to the cherry's emerging popularity after cherry prints popped up in fashion designers' collections, and Selena Gomez and Margot Robbie were spotted in cherry print ensembles. In June, Harper's Bazaar dubbed cherries "fashion’s new favorite fruit." Read more...

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10 of the best 2-in-1 laptops for beginners, experts, and everyone in between

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While laptops and tablets are great on their own, sometimes you need a machine that’s as powerful as a laptop, but with the ease of use as a tablet. Enter the hybrid laptop. These machines feature the best of both worlds, including computing power to run full-sized applications like Adobe Photoshop and the convenience of touchscreen and gesture. 

SEE ALSO: 7 of the best laptops for students heading back to school

There are a lot of really good 2-in-1 laptops out there, so we gathered together the very best that suit various needs for various people. No matter what you do for work, or whether you're still in school, we have the perfect hybrid laptop for you. Read more...

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Chris Pine and his beard seek bloody revenge in 'Outlaw King' trailer

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In all the fuss over Avengers: Infinity War, you may have wondered: How is Chris Pine doing? While the other Hollywood Chrises failed to beat Thanos, Pine was dusting off his chain mail to play Robert the Bruce, an exiled Scottish king seeking to reclaim his throne.

SEE ALSO: Kristen Stewart and Chloë Sevigny team up for love and murder in unsettling 'Lizzie' trailer

In the trailer for Outlaw King – directed by David Mackenzie, who worked with Pine on Hell or High Water – Pine does his best Scottish accent and recruits allies (including Aaron Taylor-Johnson) in Robert's quest for revenge.  Read more...

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Best deals for Monday: Save on Nerf toys, KitchenAid stand mixers, Fujifilm Instax Mini cameras, and tablets for kids at Amazon

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Happy Monday! We rounded up some of the best deals from Amazon, Walmart, and Target to get your week going. You can save on products for the home, lawn, and kitchen, along with products from Target and Amazon.

SEE ALSO: Save $60 on this device that's seven chargers in one

First up, there are deals on lawn care products from Greenworks, along with power tools from Black+Decker and GreatStar Tools. You can save 33% on Philips Hue 2Pk Color Bulb Kit. In addition, you can save up to 30% on select products and toys from Nerf by Hasbro

For the kitchen, you can save on a certified refurbished PicoBrew PICO Model C Beer Brewing Appliance, which is priced for just $199.99, or 60% off its retail priceKitchenAid's Classic Series Tilt-Head Stand Mixer is also priced at $199.99, which is $30 off. Read more...

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This $600 shoe-tying robot was made by college students

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Engineering students from the University of California, Davis, created a machine that can tie shoelaces on its own. The students had only two motors and a $600 budget to work with.  Read more...

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Fitbit's new Charge 3 fitness tracker lasts up to 7 days on a single charge

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As nice as it is to see smartwatches like the Apple Watch, Fitbit Versa, and upcoming Samsung Galaxy Watch push health and fitness features as core to ownership, it turns out many people still prefer a simpler and cheaper fitness tracker.

That's why Fitbit's still making them. Its newest fitness tracker is the Charge 3 and it improves on the Charge 2 in every way.

SEE ALSO: Samsung unveils the stylish Galaxy Watch, with an emphasis on fitness

Available in October for $149.95 ($169.95 for the Special Edition), Fitbit says it focused on three key pillars: a more premium design, improved health and fitness tracking, and smartwatch functionality. Read more...

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Amazon Prime is offering a host of exclusive shows for the UK, including the US Open live

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Amazon Prime offers a complete package of goodies to make your life easier. From unlimited one-day delivery to exclusive access to the latest deals, Prime delivers something for everyone. If you are still dithering over whether Prime is right for you, the current and upcoming Prime Video content for the UK may give you that final nudge towards a decision.

Subscribers to Prime Video can enjoy a host of exclusive and original releases such as the Purge TV event, Julia Roberts in her first ever TV show (if that's your sort of thing), and some stellar newcomers:

·  All or Nothing: Manchester City: from Aug. 17 Read more...

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This glorious British beard contest has to be seen to be believed

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Facial hair isn't just about the fuzz on your face. 

At least, not for the hundreds of people who competed in this year's British Beard and Moustache Championships, which took place in Blackpool, UK on Saturday. For these people, facial hair is a mode of expression. 

SEE ALSO: What's going on with Henry Cavill's beard in the 'Mission: Impossible – Fallout' trailer?

The competition – which is open to men, women, and non-binary people with beards — had people celebrating their facial follicles and serving up some of the most extravagant beard lewks you've ever seen. 

From the longest hipster-style beards to the most elaborate moustache designs, all beards on the spectrum were represented at the 4th year of the Championships.  Read more...

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Learn how to reduce the stress in your life with these online courses

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Odds are you could probably stand to reduce the amount of stress in your life, both at home, in the workplace, and on Twitter (mostly on Twitter). 

SEE ALSO: Take these online self-improvement classes and learn how to get fit, work smart, and start your own business

If you want to do something about it (something that's not binge-watching reality TV), these tips from a Harvard-trained physician, a former Google executive education director, and a former Stanford School of Medicine researcher could help. They're all wrapped up in an online training known as the Mindful Living Bundle Featuring Wisdom Labs — which will cost you all of $25.  Read more...

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This viral Twitter story is the perfect reminder that it's never too late to chase a dream

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It's all very well and good when people go on about chasing your dreams, but surely all that stuff is just wishful thinking, right? Don't the realities of life often mean that ambitions are too often simply not practical to achieve?

Well, maybe. But not always.

On Sunday, writer Charlotte Clymer shared the story of Kathryn Joosten, who began her acting career at the age of 40. 

SEE ALSO: J.K. Rowling's rejection letters give hope to the writer in us all

Here's the thread, in full:

In 1980, a psychiatric nurse at Chicago's Michael Reese Hospital (and mother of two) divorced her husband in the midst of a particularly troubled married life and decided to pursue her lifelong dream of an acting career. She was 40.

— Charlotte Clymer🏳️‍🌈 (@cmclymer) August 19, 2018 Read more...

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Best UK deals for Monday: Save on Nokia smartphones, Lenovo laptops, Samsung Galaxy tablets, and more

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With the end of the school holidays only two weeks away, we have collected the very best deals from top retailers to keep everyone entertained as the clock ticks down on summer.

We are showcasing deals on Samsung products, like the 50-inch Smart 4K Ultra HD TV and the Galaxy Tab. Alongside these tech products, you can save on mobile deals from Nokia and Sony, as well as a £150.99 saving on a Lenovo laptop.

If the holidays have got on top of you and that pile of washing is growing to a worrying height, then there are a number of deals offering significant savings on washing machines, with products from BEKO and Samsung strong enough to handle that backlog. Read more...

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